peHUB Second Opinion 10.27

Excited about Exits? Reformed Broker said its “Too soon, guys.” Then he adds a second “too soon” after that in case you didn’t catch the tone of slight condescension. (Seems he would prefer you exit your “weak, debt-laden offerings” companies during the next bubble.) (Reformed Broker)

Creative Deal Structures 101: In case you’re just discovering the “How do I do deals in a credit crunch?” conundrum, here is a guide to creative earn-outs and other financing techniques. (NetNewsDesk)

From the Campaign Trail with Steve Pagliuca: “Or ‘Pags,’ as no one except his campaign literature calls him.” (Boston.com)

See! Look! Positive News! Boy private equity is taking a drubbing in the press lately. With all this buyout bashing, Dealscape writes that the fickle mainstream media is ignoring private equity’s great successes, like Toys ‘R’ Us. (I’d prefer to call Toys ‘R’ Us a success once it’s been exited.) I’m not sure private equity firms need media love, but if they wanted it, they could start by giving us more data to work with. Besides, they have the PEC to toot their horns, and also, aren’t they rich white men with tons of cash? They don’t need journalists do stick up for them.

Heidi Moore: Is Hank Greenberg So Bad for Starting an AIG 2? (Daily Intel)

Helping The Jocks: Maybe it’s only funny to me, but it seems to reinforce meathead stereotypes that there’s now an outreach program to teach football players about personal finance. (Financial Finesse)

In Case You Care about journalist rivalries: Charlie Gasparino of CNBC and Andrew Ross Sorkin of Dealbook and the NY Times are duking it out in a bit of a rivalry. From Fierce Finance:  “Gasparino has taken issue with a scene in Sorkin’s book in which Blankfein turns off CNBC in disgust over “what he believed was Charlie Gasparino’s ‘rumor-mongering.'” Gasparino has asked Sorkin to retract the mention. Now Sorkin’s own colleagues may have some issues. The New York Post reports that some of fellow Times reporters don’t consider him a team player and think of him as “an apologist for everyone on Wall Street who created this mess.”